When troubleshooting, must I be logged in as Administrator?

  • 8 Replies
  • 5274 Views
*

Offline br1anstorm

  • Bronze Member
  • 12
I have just registered and will probably be seeking serious help in the relevant forum.  But this is a basic question to start with.

I have a Dell laptop running XP Pro, updated to SP3.  I have AVG 9.0 Free antivirus, and ZoneAlarm Free firewall (and SpyBot and Ad-Aware).

I have three accounts on the computer - myself as Admin, myself as User, and my wife as User.

Normally we use the User accounts.  I only log in to the Admin account when getting Windows Updates, installing new programmes, and running cleanup and defrag.

If/when I need to get forum help in tracing and resolving problems (I currently have a problem with slow-running, Windows Updates not installing, and Internet Explorer 8 not displaying some web pages including various Microsoft help and support sites) - do I have to be logged in as Administrator?

*

Offline PCBruiser

  • Malware Removal Mentors
  • Ambassador
  • Diamond Member
  • 8146
Re: When troubleshooting, must I be logged in as Administrator?
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2010, 08:29:17 AM »
Hi,

If your user accounts are restricted, i.e., they do not have full Administrator rights (your User accounts are assigned to the Administrator Group), then logging on as Administrator is necessary in some situations.  The staff member handling your issue will tell you when that is necessary.  For purposes of running HJT in XP for your initial post, you should run it in your user account.

That's a good question.
Don't Read?  Can't learn!

*

Offline br1anstorm

  • Bronze Member
  • 12
Re: When troubleshooting, must I be logged in as Administrator?
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2010, 11:35:33 AM »
Thanks, PCBruiser.

As this is a home computer, not networked but linked only to our internet router, there are only the three accounts on it and the User ones are shown as "Limited Accounts" (which restricts the user's ability to access, run or change various programs). 

I confess I'm not sure whether or how they might be assigned to the "Administrator group" - whatever that is.  Perhaps such "groups" only exist when you have several computers networked or sharing printers and servers? 

I'm now doing my homework reading up on how to use HJT, since I have never before had a problem which required it.  But since my problem appears to be with installing Windows Updates (which can only be done as an Administrator), would a HJT log run in a User account reveal the necessary information?

*

Offline PCBruiser

  • Malware Removal Mentors
  • Ambassador
  • Diamond Member
  • 8146
Re: When troubleshooting, must I be logged in as Administrator?
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2010, 11:40:08 AM »
Yes, as a starting point.  We have far more powerful diagnostics/tools available to us which require using them under supervision.  Inability to perform Windows updates can indicate malware, OR, a problem in your Windows setup - a corrupted file for example.  Whatever, we can find and fix it in almost every case.

Assigning users to the Administration group can be done via settings within Windows.  If you decide you want to set either of you into that group, the Staff member helping you can direct you on how to do it.
Don't Read?  Can't learn!

*

Offline br1anstorm

  • Bronze Member
  • 12
Re: When troubleshooting, must I be logged in as Administrator?
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2010, 07:08:27 PM »
Just thought I'd add - for the benefit of anyone else who reads this thread - that it seems one cannot install and run HiJackThis from an XP User account.

I tried to install and run HiJackThis when logged in to my user account.  The installer downloaded to my (user) desktop.  But when I tried to run it and to install it in the default (C drive) location, a popup told me that I could not do so, and should log in as Administrator.

So that's what I did - installed and ran HiJackThis as Administrator, saved the logfile in my User account, and then copied and posted it from there.

The action on my problem has now shifted to the forum that deals with HijackThis logs!

br1anstorm

*

Offline faith_michele

  • Anti - Phishing Staff
  • Gold Member
  • 1947
    • A Beacon of Light
Re: When troubleshooting, must I be logged in as Administrator?
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2010, 03:20:56 AM »
Hi br1anstorm,

You should be able to run it from a user account from the Desktop.  Follow the instructions here - http://spywarehammer.com/simplemachinesforum/index.php?topic=88.0

If you are having problems running it from the Desktop (even in XP, with a Limited User Account-LUA), it might be due to something else. It's good that you posted it in the Hijackthis forum.
Microsoft Consumer Security MVP, July 2007-June 2010

"Fight your fights, find the grace in all the things that you can't change and help somebody, if you can." Van Zant

A Beacon of Light

*

Offline br1anstorm

  • Bronze Member
  • 12
Re: When troubleshooting, must I be logged in as Administrator?
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2010, 05:12:10 PM »
Hello faith_michele,

I had read the instructions on How to Create and Post a HiJackThis log, which were very clear.

Just to clarify, the issue I had was where to install HiJackThis before running it.  I did download the installer to my User desktop.  When I clicked Run, I got the prompt for an install location, and the default offered was "C:\Program Files\Trend Micro\HiJackThis".  I clicked Install, and that was when I got a message saying something like "You don't have permission to access.... you must log on with Administrator privileges...".

I recall seeing this message on other occasions when logged into my User account and seeking to install or run certain programs.  I suppose that if, as User, I had chosen a different install location for HiJackThis (eg a thumb drive or external disk, or - if possible - my User desktop) then maybe I could have continued with the install, and run the program.  I just assumed that with a LUA, I did not have permission to install or indeed uninstall programs on the C: drive.

That's why I simply logged out as User, and logged in as Admin, to install HiJackThis in the default (C:drive) location - which I did - and then ran it and posted the logfile in the relevant forum.

Does that clarify matters?

Incidentally now that HiJackThis is installed on my C:drive, it has a shortcut icon on my Admin account desktop.  Perhaps I could run it while logged on as User, by using Windows Explorer to go and click on the HiJackThis program where it's listed on the C:drive?  But I'm not sure whether there is any point in doing so.

Rgds....br1anstorm     

*

Offline PCBruiser

  • Malware Removal Mentors
  • Ambassador
  • Diamond Member
  • 8146
Re: When troubleshooting, must I be logged in as Administrator?
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2010, 06:20:14 AM »
Hi,

You are now being helped in our Malware forum by Hoov.  He will be happy to answer any questions there.  Receiving help from multiple people can create confusion and cause issues while removing malware.  It is best to let one Staff member deal with your system's issues.
Don't Read?  Can't learn!

*

Offline br1anstorm

  • Bronze Member
  • 12
Re: When troubleshooting, must I be logged in as Administrator?
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2010, 04:18:43 PM »
Hello PCBruiser. 

Your message absolutely understood.  I'm in dialogue with Hoov in the Malware forum, and in fact wasn't seeking separate help here in this thread.  Apologies for any unintended confusion.

I had in fact thought that this thread was at an end, as I actually said in my 30 July post that action had shifted to the other forum.

However I just happened to notice that faith_michele had subsequently commented on my earlier post in this thread.  As it seemed she might not have been clear about what exactly I had done when trying to run HiJackThis as User then as Admin, I thought I ought to explain more fully.  I was simply describing what I had done - I certainly wasn't looking for more, or separate advice. 

I'm content to stick to discussing my current computer-problem with Hoov over in the Malware forum:  he's being very helpful and efficient and I really appreciate his advice.

Apologies again - the last thing I wanted to do was cause confusion!

With best wishes... br1anstorm